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SavetheWorld

Page history last edited by Malcolm 5 years, 4 months ago

Talk to people about Climate Change and their eye glaze over and you lose a friend!

The subject is so complex and there are so many opinions and vested interests that the average man woman or child switches off and leaves it to the government to decide.

Governments in democracies do not spend much money unless the cause appeals to the people.

 

Deadlock!  Stalemate!   Insufficient action to solve the problem before the deadline!

 

What have we achieved so far? Most people think they are helping the planet by recycling waste. However this makes very little difference to the onset of Climate Change. Burning fossil fuels makes the biggest difference and the worst fuel to burn is coal. If we achieve as good an acceptance of ending the role of coal then we would be getting somewhere.

 

Save the World!   Kill the Coal!  Must be the message for all generations.

 

It must be presented simply but accurately in many ways but this game and later improvements could lead the way.

Even my wife and our grandchildren find it intriguing.

 

The Game

 

It works well on your Android Phone or tablet computer.

For those who have never played a game before - it's easy for all.

Get this page on your phone or tablet and click on The Game and the game is yours!

It will appear as MOOC among your apps like this


 

Touch the screen to see the menu.


 

Touch PL1 or PL2 to decide player and PLAY to start

Touch the screen where you want the paddle to be and it will hit the ball up the screen.

Aim it well and it will hit the power station,

45 hits and you have saved the world.

If you touch the upper part of the screen during play a car crosses the screen.

Hitting the car wins a point and speeds up the ball.

Can you manage a faster ball?

On the left of the screen the temperature steadily rises.

The game is deliberately confusing as is the battle against climate change.

Refugees are displaced by floods and emergencies increasingly divert attention from your task.

As you reduce the power station wind and solar energy are rolled out increasingly.

Refugee movements increase and cause wars which in turn divert attention from climate change

At about 2 degrees the little crab dies and a polar bear looks on sadly.

At soon the polar bear is gone and cities are near to inundation.

By then disaster, poverty and war will have taken over in many countries.

 

 

We lost!

 

The science behind the game emphasises that Coal Fired Power stations must be eliminated as a priority.

Getting a car off the road helps a bit, illustrating that demand for energy makes climate control difficult.

The little crab reminds us of the danger of more acidic oceans. Corals and shellfish cannot form shells and the tiny marine creatures upon which all sea life is based may be affected.

The polar bear represents the many animals and birds which will not adapt to the new conditions and will be wiped out.

The problems of migration from disasters are increasing and the Pentagon is assessing the resulting destabilisation in the world.

The boys playing on a concrete 'boat' in the middle of sewage and rubbish reminds us that it is those who have least will suffer the most.

Will they suffer and die in silence? The world will be a dangerous place!

 

The game was developed using open source code written by Karsten Øster Lundqvist, provided through the Begin Programming course from University of Reading. University of Reading and Karsten Øster Lundqvist have provided this using the MIT license.

My thanks to Rhys Streefland for his generous support through the course and now. Malcolm Crocker December 2015 

 

 

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